Introducing financial management information systems in developing countries
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Introducing financial management information systems in developing countries

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Published by International Monetary Fund, Fiscal Affairs Dept. in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fiscal policy.,
  • Developing countries -- Economic conditions.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementprepared by Jack Diamond and Pokar Khemani.
SeriesIMF working paper -- WP/05/196
ContributionsKhemani, Pokar., International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
The Physical Object
Pagination32 p. ;
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20876119M

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Introducing Financial Management Information Systems in Developing Countries by Jack Diamond and Pokar Khemani∗ In the past decade, developing countries have been encouraged to reform their public expenditure management systems and have increasingly embarked on major projects to computerise their government operations. The role of Financial management information systems is to connect, accumulate, process, and then provide information to all parties in the budget system on a continuous basis [44]. Financial. Introducing Financial Management Information Systems in Developing Countries () , title = {Introducing Financial Management Information Systems in Developing Countries}, booktitle = {}, year = {}, pages = {}} Share. OpenURL. Abstract. by. Keyphrases. financial management information system Powered by: About CiteSeerX ; Submit.   Most popular among these have been projects to computerize government accounting and payment operations, by introducing government financial management information systems (FMISs). This paper investigates the reason for almost universal failure to implement and sustain FMISs in by: 2.

Computerising government accounting and payment operations by introducing government financial management information systems (FMIS) has been a popular reform measure over the past decade. Why have such projects almost universally failed? This paper from the International Monetary Fund reviews the ‘received wisdom’ in implementing FMIS, and analyses problems in its application in.   FMIS and IFMIS. An FMIS usually refers to computerization of public expenditure management processes, including budget formulation, budget execution, and accounting, with the help of a fully integrated system for financial management of the line ministries (LMs) and other spending agencies. The full system should also secure integration and communication with other relevant information systems. In the past decade, developing countries have been encouraged to reform their public expenditure management systems and have increasingly embarked on major projects to computerise their government operations. Introducing Financial Management Information Systems in Developing Countries. In the past decade, developing countries have been encouraged to reform their public expenditure management systems and have increasingly embarked on major projects to computerise their government operations. Most popular among these have been projects to computerise government accounting and payment operations, by introducing government financial management information systems Cited by:

accountable public financial management is a key pillar of governance reform and of vital importance to provide public services of good quality to citizens, as well as to create and maintain fair and sustainable economic and social conditions in a country. Introducing Financial Management Information Systems in Developing Countries In the past decade, developing countries (DCs) have been encouraged to reform their public expenditure management systems and have increasingly embarked on major projects to computerize their government operations. The World Bank alone has lent over US$ billion for investment in public sector financial management information system (FMIS) projects. 2 While the pace of this investment may vary year to year, significant sums will continue to be spent on FMIS and related information communication technology (IT) projects as technology advances and business needs change. Paralleling this .   Most popular among these have been projects to computerize government accounting and payment operations, by introducing government financial management information systems (FMISs). This paper investigates the reason for almost universal failure Cited by: